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Still no news on the Uppsala Ph.D. Well, it’s only been two weeks, so if they got many applications they may not yet have made their decision on who to call for interview. Other than that, work continues as usual. The winter meeting of the Professional Zooarchaeology Group is next Saturday, so you can expect a post on that later.

- The National Antiquities Board in Sweden has digitalised the entire series of Sveriges runinskrifter (Runic inscriptions in Sweden). All files are large pdfs, so if you’re on a slow connection, beware. And I guess I don't have to warn that they are in Swedish, right?

- An international conference on use-wear analysis is taking place 10-12 October in Faro, Portugal. This announcement was planned for an earlier post, as the deadline for submission of papers and posters was 30th January… But bookmark the site if the subject appeals to you. I haven’t had much contact with use-wear studies since my uni days, as it’s not a common thing in commercial archaeology. Essentially, for you non-archaeologists, use-wear studies analyses the wear traces different materials leave on various archaeological objects. For example flint knives used to cut grass have different polish than ones used to cut antler. I really look forward to the publication of the preliminary program (30th June). There may be studies of relevance to my interests! There was one talk at the ICAZ worked bone research group meeting in 2003 on use-wear on hide working tools (the talks were published as From hooves to horn 2005.), and maybe someone is still doing studies on this.

- There’s a very interesting post up on Bones don’t lie on
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Still no news on the Uppsala Ph.D. Well, it’s only been two weeks, so if they got many applications they may not yet have made their decision on who to call for interview. Other than that, work continues as usual. The winter meeting of the Professional Zooarchaeology Group is next Saturday, so you can expect a post on that later.

- The National Antiquities Board in Sweden has digitalised the entire series of <em>Sveriges runinskrifter</em> (<a href="http://www.raa.se/cms/extern/kulturarv/arkeologi_och_fornlamningar/runstenar/digitala_sveriges_runinskrifter.html">Runic inscriptions in Sweden</a>). All files are large pdfs, so if you’re on a slow connection, beware. And I guess I don't have to warn that they are in Swedish, right?

- An <a href="http://www.usewear2012.com/">international conference on use-wear analysis</a> is taking place 10-12 October in Faro, Portugal. This announcement was planned for an earlier post, as the deadline for submission of papers and posters was 30th January… But bookmark the site if the subject appeals to you. I haven’t had much contact with use-wear studies since my uni days, as it’s not a common thing in commercial archaeology. Essentially, for you non-archaeologists, use-wear studies analyses the wear traces different materials leave on various archaeological objects. For example flint knives used to cut grass have different polish than ones used to cut antler. I really look forward to the publication of the preliminary program (30th June). There may be studies of relevance to my interests! There was one talk at the ICAZ worked bone research group meeting in 2003 on use-wear on hide working tools (the talks were published as <em>From hooves to horn</em> 2005.), and maybe someone is still doing studies on this.

- There’s a very interesting post up on <a href="http://bonesdontlie.wordpress.com/">Bones don’t lie</a> on <a href="http://bonesdontlie.wordpress.com/2012/01/24/status-and-rank-in-mortuary-archaeology/”&gt;status and rank in mortuary archaeology&lt;/a&gt;, i.e. how funeral arrangements can display the living person’s status in society, with the added paradox that sometimes the living person’s status is entirely invisible in a funerary context, or that our interpretation of burial goods contradicts the principles of that society. For examples, rich people could spend money on lavish rites rather than actual grave goods, rendering their rank invisible archaeologically.

- Another interesting human osteology blog is &lt;a href=" http://thesebonesofmine.wordpress.com/"="http://thesebonesofmine.wordpress.com/&quot;">These bones of mine</a>, which I found through link hopping. This brings me actually to a conundrum: there are so many interesting human osteology blogs and archaeological blogs, but I have rarely come across any blog focussing on animal osteology. Am I looking in the wrong places, or are animal osteologists less inclined to blog than human osteologists? (obviously animal osteologists lack opposing thumbs and are therefore blogging much slower... :-) )
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