ossamenta: Scientist clones dinosaur for T-rex steaks (Science)
[personal profile] ossamenta
The irritating part of being an osteologist (well, one irritating part anyway) is that you know so many exceptions to the rules, and complications that when you see articles as this one: A skeleton excavated in the ruins of an Ipswich friary has been identified as a medieval African man, which of course is really interesting, but I do wonder how much of the statements (for example "the man was born a Muslim in 13th-Century Tunisia, who was taken to England during the ninth Crusade. It is thought he converted to Christianity before living in England for over ten years, [...] before a burial in the Friary itself.") are journalistic shortcuts and how much the scientists could actually pinpoint? 13th century - sure, I accept that. But why specifically Tunisia, and not just "coastal north Africa"? Inquiring minds want to know!

Yes, I could write to the archaeological unit that did the excavation, but you know, that would be work :-) . Or wait until the proper report gets published.


On a less grumbly note, I can recommend the following site blogs (in Swedish only, I'm afraid) for those of you who have a yearning for being out in the muck and finding cool things:
- Åkroken i Nyköping: Medieval.
- Motala Ström: Mesolithic and Neolithic (and some Iron Age too).
- Kvarteret Druvan/Dovhjorten i Jönköping: 17th century and Medieval.

Any tips on other interesting site blogs?

Date: 2010-05-12 07:18 pm (UTC)
vatine: Generated with some CL code and a hand-designed blackletter font (Default)
From: [personal profile] vatine
I must confess to quite liking Aardvarchaeology, but I am not sure it qualifies as "a site blog". Dr Rundqvist is, nonetheless, an interesting read.

Date: 2010-05-13 06:35 am (UTC)
vatine: Generated with some CL code and a hand-designed blackletter font (Default)
From: [personal profile] vatine
Can't say I do, but I'll add it to my feed reader.

Though strictly speaking, the closest I get to archaeology is delving deep into the historic layers of configuration for pieces of tech and while requiring some interesting skills and inclinations, it's all metaphorical strata, imaginary digging and produces only artefacts of information. I actually started reading aard because I know Martin (though I can't say I remember when I last saw him in the flesh).

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